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Sustainability is protecting the environment, working well with others, and being excellent at what we do.

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Wildlife

NGO’s Pest Protection and Leadership in Canada

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Pest Control Duality: Whistler Chimney & Services

http://whistlerchimney.com/

whistler-chimney

  • Chimney Sweeping & Inspection; 
  • Vent and Air Duct Services;
  • Emergency Services; and
  • Fireplaces.

Born and Bred in Whistler, Squamish, and Pemberton British Columbia.  

A member of Critter Get Ritter, WETT BC, Whistler Chamber of Commerce and more!

 

We are “Sustainabily Focused On Your Environment.”

 

 

If you havent already contact us for more information

(604) 902-741

info@crittergetritter.com

 

Canadian Green Building Council Letter

Critter Get Ritter

PO Box 754,

Whistler, BC V0N 1B0

 

January 13th, 2014

 

Canadian Green Building Council

47 Clarence Street, Suite 202

Ottawa, Ontario K1N 9K1

 

Dear Sir/Madam:

 

Congratulations on developing and contributing to the conservation of our environment and your recent accomplishments including rapid cumulative growth during the past four years, as well as awarding the skilled local contractors over the major corporate big city contractors. It is also great that your organization and green building designations achieved great recognition when Vancouver achieved the ‘Best Green Building Policy’ in the world Greenest City 2020 Action Plan World GBC Government Leadership Awards. We commend your designated achievements and look forward to hearing more about the council in the future, nice work!

 

Our Canadian similarities are futile compared to the USA Green Building Council and LEED, including other international developing green building groups and UN associations. We know more could be done to develop an iconic vivid heritage that has ensured our survival during our country’s past 300 years during our growth and development. What is the Canadian Green Building Council doing differently to keep our iconic Canadian culture and heritage alive, functioning, conscientious, alert and unique in their own building and manufacturing practices? What is done differently that justifies your organizations current growth?

 

We seem misdirected moving away from the simple building materials, including those reused or derived more sustainably from forestry, and mining, especially where shut down and in operation during the past. It is an embarrassment that iconic Canadian building standards like wood and solid fuel burning; as well as cultural heritages and history of: fisheries and oceans; agriculture and farming; and trapping, hunting and fur trading are not mentioned on your website, reports, and certifications. It is sad and disappointing that more Canadian organizations, industries, and councils such as yours are not getting more involved in this, and that our future generations cannot wake up and not see what it might have been to be a Canadian a hundred years ago, or more. Too many are already experiencing what is not truly iconic or a part of our traditional heritage and culture and your organization is doing little to nothing about it.

 

What can be done to revert our great nation back to the international recognition it deserves, as a country of survivors and pioneers who thrived on survival and self-sufficiency in our cold and remote climates? Canada is not the source of “Arctic Cold” but of rich resources and independent spirit that can be built upon using the tenacity of natural materials, and continuance of organic skills and experiences. Historically we have achieved this and created our identity as a nation of haves, not dependant upon greater industrialization but our interdependent survival aptitudes.

 

As a committed, young, experienced entrepreneur and professional, the quality and type of the ingredients makes the best flavor: a willingness to serve others, communicate and recognize customers, communities, countries and those from overseas thus ensuring needs are met and exceeded by the preeminent. Without distinctive partisan leadership and action, including diligent and energetic staff desiring to lead and construct a truly Canadian Green Building Council your future may yield frustrations, and defeat. Your organization can provide endless potential, but we demand your ability to construct uniquely Canadian structures and identities derived from our heritage and culture thus truly enjoying our green iconic identity where communities can thrive and survive in there own natural environments. Survival through endurance bonds a unique prosperity others will only desire when we can build upon and share.

 

Thank you,

Regards,

Sincerely,

Tristan Galbraith

Critter Get Ritter

(604) 902-7417

-- 

Tristan Galbraith
Critter Get Ritter
(604) 902-7417

 

 

Green Building Council Jan 13th

Tristan Galbraith and Gary Bizzo Toronto Star Write Up

http://www.thestar.com/business/small_business/people/2013/02/12/simple-management-strategies-to-deal-with-the-four-types-of-smal.html  

Bat Pictures

 

 

Check out these bat pictures:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more local bat information and Whistler, Squamish and Pemberton sustainability check out our former blog http://crittergetritter.wordpress.com

 

 

More Grey/Black Squirrel; and Squirrel Versus Bird Pictures

 

Grey or Black Squirrels are a invasive species being sighted more and more often in Brackendale, Squamish and the Squamish Highlands.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These fur-balls have even been sighted as far as the Whistler and Pemberton Valleys.

Never hesitate to contact us if you think you see a grey squirrel.

 

 

 

SEA TO SKY RACCOON

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During dark, sometimes rainy and creepy nights, these masked furry faces wander our Squamish, Whistler and Pemberton communities. The Raccoon (or procyon lotor) are known as the original members of the procyonidae family that lived and are believed to have originated in Europe 25 million years ago.

They enjoy a healthy life span of about 16 years, with sizes ranging from a meager 8 to a healthy 20 pounds. Gestation often takes place in the spring and is about 65 days, with between 2 to 5 kits being born and nurtured there on.

Sadly, hunting and traffic are the most common forms of death here in the wilds of our Sea to Sky corridor but about five years ago there was also a mysterious disease that wiped out many out.

 

Though previously thought to be solitary, there is now evidence that raccoons engage in gender-specific social behaviour. Related females often share a common area, while unrelated males live together in groups of up to four animals to maintain their positions against foreign males during the mating season. Like bears and other mammals, fathers are fended away by the mother because quite often, he will kill the kits, or young raccoons, so he can reproduce continuously.

 

Not only are there love for garbage and recycling a problem and commonality with bears, molecular analysis actually indicates a close relationship so please read on, and remember to lock and secure all garbage and recycling areas.

 

Territorial home range from 7.5 to 100 acres for females and 20 to 200 acres for males, hence lady raccoons are definitely home-bodies and not into relocating. Relocating or killing these critters should only be handled by professionals, and on the grounds of animal welfare doing so without is forbidden. Some experts have even challenged these arguments and give advice on feeding however it is our opinion that they belong in the wild, and do not make pets. Once they are no longer babies, around there first birthdays, they are active, and independent – and yes, if their natural independence is thwarted they will become very destructive and bite the hand that feeds them.

 

When raccoons create nests, they like a safe, protected, sheltered and warm place. They tear up soffits, attics, chimneys, foundations, and can cause extensive damage to gardens and homes. They can bite and scratch transmitting rabies, leptospirosis and other parasites such as the common flu.

 

If you have questions or information on raccoons and there sightings you can contact us anytime.  Thank you, Critter Get Ritter

Cool Critters! Black and Rufous Elephant Shrew

The Black and Rufous Elephant Shrew (Rhynchocyon petersi), known to Africans as the Black and Rufous Sengi, is one of 16 species of elephant shrew currently identified and alive in Africa today. It is the first of many articles included in our new ´cool critter´ series leading and supporting global and local environmental protection, sustainability and information on the help and encouragement of local and worldwide biodiversity while educating others. It eats insects and small mammals (especially the Black Rat) as well as vegetation which could lead to another critter get ritter cutting edge solution to sustainable forms of using bio-control for pest control…

Including its beautiful red, brown and black fur is quite a massive (11inch, 1-1.5lb) size difference compared to the local identified British Columbia Sea to Sky shrews and voles which really shouldn’t be confused at all since all the elephant shrews belong to different family or order.

Sea to Sky shrews or shrew voles (family Soricidae) are small mole like mammals classified in the order Soricomorpha who dont need to gnaw on things but have sharp, spike-like teeth, unlike the gnawing front incisor teeth that can cause pain on rodents and thus damage to strutures. Be sure to hit us up soon for more articles on cools critters, forms of bio-control pest control and other neat Whistler, Squamish and Pemberton pest control blog articles.

Win Win: Door Trim, Exclusion & Rodent Entry + Green Sustainable Hydro Savings:

 

Doing your best to keep rodents and other small critters out of your structures while also using less energy, and money just became a lot easier. Critter Get Ritter Pest Control in Squamish, Whistler and Pemberton has a special offer that using some special skills and tools can assure your home or business a better place (and hopefully special too):

Believe it or not small rodents can squish through tiny gaps as small as a pencil width often nibbling or chewing there way through just about anything. To stop dirty filthy and unsanitary rodents, we have thrived on hands on mechanical work such as installing door trim, re-aligning doors, and replacing trim on sliding screen doors.   Structural repair and work is often the foundation for any IPM (integrated pest management) program especially when your pest control technician is skilled in carpentry and handyman work.

 

Other critter problem areas can include areas on exterior buildings where gaps are left like between siding and panels, where foundations meet framing, slabs meet siding, soffits, roofs and so on. If you ever have questions about exclusion, rodents; and even bats, raccoons and squirrels, please contact us any time.

Empathetic rats


Research in Science suggests that rats are capable of a human characteristic: empathy. The study below tested response when a fellow rats was trapped, and they found that not only do they spend time and energy deliberately helping the trapped companions, but they would even share food after rescuing them.

Using a small square arena, with a cage in the center; rats were trapped, and sometimes not. When another 2nd rat was released, it would either wandered around of let his fellow rat go (Traps release mechanism eventually picked up in the 12 day study).

The rats were noticeably agitated when one was trapped, and tended to circle the center, dig, and call to the trapped; when the cage was empty, these behaviors were absent. Over the course of the experiment, the rats learned to open the cage, and became much faster at doing so. A extremely higher percentage that were inside the arena, with a trapped rat, opened the cage (23 out of 30); compared to the rats that were in the arena with an empty cage (5 out of 40). Clearly, these annoying little furballs are excited to open a cage when a fellow companion is stuck inside.

.::Interesting Fact::. During the 12 trials, female rats were more likely to open the cage than males were (100% vs. 70%).

Researchers then upped the ante with another 2nd trap filled with chocolate chips, (rats really like chocolate). Rats were as likely to open the cage with there companion, as they were to open the cage with the chocolate, suggesting that the motivation to free a trapped companion is about as strong as the motivation to eat the chocolate. Additionally, in more than half of the trials, the free rats shared the chocolate with the trapped rat after freeing it. The free rats actually ate fewer chocolate chips when there was another rat in the arena than they did when they were alone, indicating a willingness to share the bounty.

.::Interesting Fact::.We don’t know whether rats were trying to alleviate other rats distress, or to make themselves feel better about the whole situation…

Squamish pest control services

What is pest control:

Pest Control is a service provided by a certified technician with proper equipment and in a suitable environment. There are a number of tools we use; and because of the seasonal environments we are constantly changing our focus on different pest’s, tools, chemicals and more. Included in this blog are current Squamish Pest’s, tips and there locations

Silverfish, Pill Bugs, and black rats in the: Highlands

Spiders, Ants, Mice, Rats, and Squirrels in: Valleycliffe

Raccoons and *Grey/Black Squirrels in Brakendale, and more.


* Invasive (non-native) Species

You can contact us anytime, enjoy this beautiful weather, and be sure to check back soon.

2012 Small Business BC Successful You Awards

After finishing last years small business bc awards in the top five  for best concept included below is the links to our 2012 nominations:

 

 

 

Please take 30 seconds; click on the links, give our profile a read and vote.  Thank you, Tristan
 

 

 

 

 

 

Funny Squirrel and River Otter Pictures

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canadian Scientists Help Research Bed Bugs That Spread Drug-Resistant Bacteria:

Residents of an impoverished area of Vancouver were infested with bed bugs carrying antibiotic-resistant bacteria, said researchers today Wednesday May 11th, 2011, and warn doctors to watch out for the potential problem.

A letter in todays issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s journal Emerging Infectious Diseases reported that two types of drug-resistant bacteria were isolated from bedbugs found on three patients.
The resistant bacteria were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE), a less dangerous form of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Christopher Lowe of the University of Toronto and medical microbiologist Marc Romney of Vancouver’s St. Paul’s Hospital suggest bed bugs carrying MRSA could transmit the bacteria during a blood meal. Included is a citation to the full article which is being released in June, here:

“Because of the insect’s ability to compromise the skin integrity of its host, and the propensity for S. aureus to invade damaged skin, bedbugs may serve to amplify MRSA infections in impoverished urban communities,” Lowe and Romney write. The three patients lived in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, which has high rates of homelessness, poverty, HIV/AIDS and injection drug use.

Similar to other cities worldwide, Vancouver has seen an alarming increase in bedbugs, particularly in Downtown Eastside, where 31 per cent of residents have reported infestations, the researchers said.

Likewise, MRSA is also a substantial problem in the neighbourhood, with nearly 55 per cent of skin and soft tissue infections in patients treated at St. Paul’s emergency department showing MRSA, the authors said.

In drug injection users with wound infections, an earlier study showed 43 per cent were colonized or infected with a community-acquired MRSA strain found outside of hospitals.

The study was small with just five bedbugs and very preliminary, but “it’s an intriguing finding” that needs to be further researched, said Romney.

Both resistant strains are often seen in hospitals, and experts have been far more concerned about nurses and other health-care workers spreading the bacteria than insects.

Given the high prevalence of MRSA in hotels and rooming houses in Downtown Eastside, the insects may act as “a hidden environmental reservoir for MRSA and may promote the spread of MRSA in impoverished and overcrowded communities,” the authors said.

So: This could be sticky but is it currently significant?

The authors point out that several research groups have tried in the past to link bedbugs and disease transmission (hepatitis) and failed. They certainly have not proven transmission in this case. But they also say that there is a density of these two organisms in the area where the men live that make it more likely that bedbugs could be involved in diseases pingponging through the neighborhood. First, there’s the high density of bedbug presence, in 31 percent of Downtown Eastside residents. Second, there’s the high prevalence of MRSA, in 58 percent of the skin infections in the St. Paul’s ER. And third, there’s the previously recorded and persistent presence of VRE in in-patients at St. Paul’s.

The US CDC believes that crowding, poor hygiene and skin disruption increase the likelihood of MRSA infection; crowding and poor hygiene are common in homelessness and shelter living, and bedbugs by definition disrupt the skin’s barrier by their bites. Meanwhile, in the ill and hospitalized, VRE frequently causes infections in disrupted skin, such as a surgical incision or a diabetic ulcer.

The authors have commented:

“…These insects may act as a hidden environmental reservoir for MRSA and may promote the spread of MRSA in impoverished and overcrowded communities. Bedbugs carrying MRSA and/or VRE may have the potential to act as vectors for transmission.”

To be clear: The victims here are also the ones who are likely to be most at risk. What this paper says, first of all, is that the substandard living conditions of being poor and homeless make those who are poor and homeless more likely to be vulnerable to yet more dangerous and difficult diseases. As with so many other health disparities in North American society, this is a social justice issue.

But if I am candid, it is also a reminder to the more-privileged rest of us that bedbugs have spread explosively, especially in poor communities, in a manner that is not completely understood, and that they pose a disease-transmission risk that is not yet well-defined.

We can assure you there will be more bed bugs to come and in the mean time I am going to check my box spring…

More Bats

 

Here is a listing of every species of bat recorded in British Columbia (from Canadian Caver Website):

     

      • California Myotis (Myotis californicus).
      • Western Small-footed Myotis (Myotis ciliolabrum).
      • Western Long-eared Myotis (Myotis evotis).
      • Keen’s Long-eared Myotis (Myotis keenii).
      • Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus).
      • Northern Long-eared Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis).
      • Fringed Myotis (Myotis thysanodes)
      • Long-legged Myotis (Myotis volans).
      • Yuma Myotis (Myotis yumanensis).
      • Western Red Bat (Lasiurus blossevillii).
      • Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinereus).
      • Silver-haired Bat 3 (Lasionycteris noctivagans).
      • Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus).
      • Spotted Bat (Euderma maculatum).
      • Townsend’s Big-eared Bat (Coryorhinus townsendii).
      • Pallid Bat (Antrozous pallidus).

     

    This totals 17 of the 18 recorded in Canada north of the 49th.